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Kilimanjaro port2018-12-04T20:46:44+00:00

Project Description

KILIMANJARO CHARITY CHALLENGE

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Kilimanjaro Charity Challenge – the words ‘Kilimanjaro’ and ‘Challenge’ are synonymous. This is an iconic charity challenge to the highest point on the entire African continent and the world’s highest free standing mountain.

Summit success on Kilimanjaro is strongly related to the amount of time you spend acclimatising. It is a serious safety issue and we therefore strongly recommend, and use, the Lemosho route. It is the longest (8 days/7 nights) and therefore best for acclimatisation. It also has the highest rate of summit success.

Find out if you can you train for altitude?

What do we offer on our Kilimanjaro Charity Challenge? In short:

  • 2 people will guarantee our Kilimanjaro Charity Challenge departures – just 2!
  • Return international flights, London – Kilimanjaro + return airport transfers
  • 2 nights hotel (1 before and 1 after the trek)
  • All meals and water on trek, b’fasts in hotels
  • Experienced Guide and full support crew; daily health checks on the mountain
  • Full support pre-trek

This is a genuinely tough but achievable challenge.

It’s all about that final climb to the summit, reaching the crater rim at Stella Point and then to the signpost at Uhuru. Fantastic. The preamble around part of the southern circuit is the warm up, the acclimatisation phase of what is to come.

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Some important detail:

Don’t think a day makes a difference?
Think again.
It is a medically proven fact that an additional day acclimatising makes a huge difference in the body’s ability to acclimatise. It can be the difference between summiting and not.
Why take the chance; use the Lemosho route.

Kilimanjaro, close to the summit

Good months to go are: Jan, Feb, Jun and Sep/Oct.

There are 4 main factors to consider when to go: temperature, rainfall, cloud cover, crowds (number of people likely to be on the trails).

To have warm temperatures, no rain, no cloud cover and no crowds is not going to happen! So there’s a balance to be had.

Mar/Apr/May has the highest rainfall (wet season) and should ideally be avoided.
Aug/Sep/Oct are the driest months but will have a higher people traffic level due to holidays.
Jan/Feb are warmer months.

No matter when you go, it will be sub zero temperatures on the top!

There can be few places (if any) in the world that has the climatic variation that Kilimanjaro experiences.

Moshi (at the base of Kilimanjaro) sits at 1800m and the top of Kili is at 5895m, so there’s a huge difference of 4095m (2.5 miles) in vertical height. It’s therefore no surprise that there’s a huge change in the climatic conditions.

They are categorised:

Bushland – up to 1800m
Rainforest – 1800 – 2800m
Heath/moorland – 2800 – 4000m
Alpine Desert – 4000 – 5000m
Arctic – >5000m

kilimanjaro charity challenge

You will be walking between 4 – 7 hours per day. The exception is summit day. Distances in mountainous terrain is measured in hours, not distance.

The preamble trek around the mountain’s southern circuit is not massively physical at all. That element is all about acclimatisation. The summit trek is a different kettle of fish; it’s a beast. It’s around 1400m of ascent, through the night (cold and dark) and the underfoot conditions can be extremely soft, especially near the top. When combined with the descent initially back to Barafu (and then beyond), you’ll be on your feet for over 12 hrs; it’s a very long day.

Temperatures during the day (sun up) will vary between 15°C and 25°C. As soon as the sun drops, the temperatures will fall and the night temperatures will drop to below zero most of the time. You need a sleeping bag that will take you comfortably down to -10°C.

Kili is all about that final climb. Adrenaline and sheer determination will get you there provided the altitude is kind to you. When training, work on those legs for they will carry you up, up and up to the highest place Africa can offer.

In the UK, if you can walk for 5 – 6 hrs per day, on consecutive days, over undulating terrain (with normal rest stops), carrying a daysack weighing approx 6kg, then you have a good foundation for completing this trek.

High Altitude Trekking – look for the ‘High Altitude’ tab on our Information webpage.

Food

  • B’fast is supplied in hotels, full board on trek (including drinking water, boiled).
  • Breakfasts are a choice of cereals, porridge, toast, eggs, spreads, etc.. plus hot drinks.
  • Lunches are packed meals, made up at b’fast.
  • Tea/coffee/biscuits are served on arrival into camp.
  • Evening meal is at least two courses; rice, pasta, lentils, vegetables, etc.. + desert (usually tinned fruit). Hot drink.

Accommodation

  • Hotels – twin share basis, same sex.
  • On trek – twin share basis, same sex.
  • If there is an odd number, someone gets lucky with sole occupation at no additional cost.
  • Sole occupation cost – see specific Kilimanjaro date webpages for costs.

International Flights – Our default flights are London Heathrow (LHR) – Kilimanjaro International Airport (JRO). We use a variety of high quality airlines using one stop (there are no direct flights to JRO from London).

London not convenient? – Other UK regional airport options are possible, such as Manchester, Glasgow and Cardiff. We appreciate the potential inconvenience of London if you live far away. Whilst using regional airports may attract supplements due to higher flight costs, that cost may be offset by the cost and time of travelling to London. Please ask for advice on 01529 488159.

The advice here is given in good faith from trusted sources; we are not medical professionals. Check with your Medical Practice if you are up to date with the primary courses.

Vaccinations:

FREE Vaccinations – the following are usually FREE on the NHS as they are considered the greatest risk if brought into the country:
Cholera, Diphtheria, Polio, Tetanus and Hep A (be aware some of those are combined vaccinations).
Information source – http://www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/1071.aspx?CategoryID=67

The others you are likely to have to pay for.

Good months to go are: Jan, Feb, Jun and Sep/Oct.

There are 4 main factors to consider when to go: temperature, rainfall, cloud cover, crowds (number of people likely to be on the trails).

To have warm temperatures, no rain, no cloud cover and no crowds is not going to happen! So there’s a balance to be had.

Mar/Apr/May has the highest rainfall (wet season) and should ideally be avoided.
Aug/Sep/Oct are the driest months but will have a higher people traffic level due to holidays.
Jan/Feb are warmer months.

No matter when you go, it will be sub zero temperatures on the top!

There can be few places (if any) in the world that has the climatic variation that Kilimanjaro experiences.

Moshi (at the base of Kilimanjaro) sits at 1800m and the top of Kili is at 5895m, so there’s a huge difference of 4095m (2.5 miles) in vertical height. It’s therefore no surprise that there’s a huge change in the climatic conditions.

They are categorised:

Bushland – up to 1800m
Rainforest – 1800 – 2800m
Heath/moorland – 2800 – 4000m
Alpine Desert – 4000 – 5000m
Arctic – >5000m

You will be walking between 4 – 7 hours per day. The exception is summit day. Distances in mountainous terrain is measured in hours, not distance.

The preamble trek around the mountain’s southern circuit is not massively physical at all. That element is all about acclimatisation. The summit trek is a different kettle of fish; it’s a beast. It’s around 1400m of ascent, through the night (cold and dark) and the underfoot conditions can be extremely soft, especially near the top. When combined with the descent initially back to Barafu (and then beyond), you’ll be on your feet for over 12 hrs; it’s a very long day.

Temperatures during the day (sun up) will vary between 15°C and 25°C. As soon as the sun drops, the temperatures will fall and the night temperatures will drop to below zero most of the time. You need a sleeping bag that will take you comfortably down to -10°C.

Kili is all about that final climb. Adrenaline and sheer determination will get you there provided the altitude is kind to you. When training, work on those legs for they will carry you up, up and up to the highest place Africa can offer.

In the UK, if you can walk for 5 – 6 hrs per day, on consecutive days, over undulating terrain (with normal rest stops), carrying a daysack weighing approx 6kg, then you have a good foundation for completing this trek.

High Altitude Trekking – look for the ‘High Altitude’ tab on our Information webpage.

Food

  • B’fast is supplied in hotels, full board on trek (including drinking water, boiled).
  • Breakfasts are a choice of cereals, porridge, toast, eggs, spreads, etc.. plus hot drinks.
  • Lunches are packed meals, made up at b’fast.
  • Tea/coffee/biscuits are served on arrival into camp.
  • Evening meal is at least two courses; rice, pasta, lentils, vegetables, etc.. + desert (usually tinned fruit). Hot drink.

Accommodation

  • Hotels – twin share basis, same sex.
  • On trek – twin share basis, same sex.
  • If there is an odd number, someone gets lucky with sole occupation at no additional cost.
  • Sole occupation cost – see specific Kilimanjaro date webpages for costs.

International Flights – Our default flights are London Heathrow (LHR) – Kilimanjaro International Airport (JRO). We use a variety of high quality airlines using one stop (there are no direct flights to JRO from London).

London not convenient? – Other UK regional airport options are possible, such as Manchester, Glasgow and Cardiff. We appreciate the potential inconvenience of London if you live far away. Whilst using regional airports may attract supplements due to higher flight costs, that cost may be offset by the cost and time of travelling to London. Please ask for advice on 01529 488159.

The advice here is given in good faith from trusted sources; we are not medical professionals. Check with your Medical Practice if you are up to date with the primary courses.

Vaccinations:

FREE Vaccinations – the following are usually FREE on the NHS as they are considered the greatest risk if brought into the country:
Cholera, Diphtheria, Polio, Tetanus and Hep A (be aware some of those are combined vaccinations).
Information source – http://www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/1071.aspx?CategoryID=67

The others you are likely to have to pay for.

kilimanjaro

Just Do It!