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EBC port2018-11-14T10:48:37+00:00

Project Description

EVEREST CHARITY TREK

EVEREST CHARITY TREK

Click your preferred date box to see full details
2019

Come with us on our Everest Charity Trek and enjoy your journey to the most famous mountaineering base camp in the world.

Our Everest Charity Trek itinerary is one of the most well thought out on the market.

  • Resilient itinerary, spare days – no point in coming this far and not making Base Camp!
  • All meals on trek, b’fasts in hotels
  • Additional time to cover delays at Lukla
  • Tea house accommodation, no camping
  • Very experienced Guides
  • Full support pre-trek, Visa help, great hotel, FREE holdall

This is a big trek; big skies, big mountains and big altitude! Can you train for altitude?

The itinerary has been carefully crafted to maximise the group’s safety and flexibility with additional days. There is plenty of time acclimatising; no point in coming here and not making Base Camp! 3 nights in Namche Bazaar and 2 more up the road makes the journey more enjoyable. It ultimately leads to a higher success rate for our Everest Charity Trek.

It’s a short exhilarating flight up to Lukla, followed by 9 days of trekking to reach Base Camp. It is a truly amazing and privileged experience to wander in amongst the highest mountains this planet has to offer.

Choose your dates above and read the full details….

Not for charity? … then visit our sister website travelandtrek.com – Everest Base Camp Treks.
More charity treks.

Worried About Lukla Delays? – failure to get to EBC could be the result. Our itineraries take this into account

Acclimatisation issues? – we don’t take chances: 3 days in Namche and 2 days in Dingbouche; more than enough

Everest Base Camp - near Namche Bazaar

Come with us on our Everest Charity Trek and enjoy your journey to the most famous mountaineering base camp in the world.

Our Everest Charity Trek itinerary is one of the most well thought out on the market.

  • Resilient itinerary, spare days – no point in coming this far and not making Base Camp!
  • All meals on trek, b’fasts in hotels
  • Additional time to cover delays at Lukla
  • Tea house accommodation, no camping
  • Very experienced Guides
  • Full support pre-trek, Visa help, great hotel, FREE holdall

This is a big trek; big skies, big mountains and big altitude! Can you train for altitude?

The itinerary has been carefully crafted to maximise the group’s safety and flexibility with additional days. There is plenty of time acclimatising; no point in coming here and not making Base Camp! 3 nights in Namche Bazaar and 2 more up the road makes the journey more enjoyable. It ultimately leads to a higher success rate for our Everest Charity Trek.

It’s a short exhilarating flight up to Lukla, followed by 9 days of trekking to reach Base Camp. It is a truly amazing and privileged experience to wander in amongst the highest mountains this planet has to offer.

Choose your dates above and read the full details….

Not for charity? … then visit our sister website travelandtrek.com – Everest Base Camp Treks.
More charity treks.

Some brief information that we know you want NOW!

Mid Mar/Apr/May and mid Sep/Oct/mid Nov are considered the best months weather wise. Worth knowing that May is historically the period when most summits on Everest are attempted so Base Camp itself will be teaming with climbing teams mid Apr – mid May.

Truth is you could trek to Everest Base Camp throughout the year but prevailing weather conditions might not be in your favour to see what you are there to see; the BIG mountain tops.

For those periods above, expect daytime temperatures to be mid 20’s and as soon as the sun drops, down to single figures and sub zero overnight. Temperatures will fall further as you progress up the trail (increased altitude) until you get to Gorak Shep when overnight temperatures will be -10°C – -15°C. Many begin this trek in shorts and convert to long trousers after 4 or 5 days as the temperatures drop.

Winter months are good (nice crisp days, excellent visibility) BUT very cold, especially at night. Even in those months quoted above, night temperatures are well below zero.

Summer months of course is monsoon season. When it rains, it rains hard but not all day as some would believe. Getting wet is not good up in the Everest region; not easy to dry clothes and you don’t really want to walk in the rain!

It’s about 40 miles (65km) from Lukla to Everest Base Camp, one way, so 80 miles (130km) return.

40 miles may not seem much over 9 days on the ascent to EBC but of course you are ascending on mountain paths and it’s all about acclimatisation. With acclimatisation walks, you will cover a bit more than that anyway.

Food. We supply you with 3 meals + 1 snack per day on trek. Breakfasts only in hotels in Kathmandu. More information is supplied with the trek information.

Drinking Water. You can either buy mineral water as you go (no shortage of supply) or you can treat/filter local supplies. There are a few considerations such as the use of plastic bottles, cost and the guarantee of safe drinking water. Given the recommendation is to drink around 3 litres of water per day on trek (total over the trek is therefore ~40 litres), it’s worth thinking about. Read our blog on our sister website for a more in depth view.

Sleeping. On trek, you will sleep in mountain lodges known as Tea Houses, so no camping! There are villages all of the way up the trail. Tea Houses consist of communal areas (dining hall/community area) + a kitchen, toilets and a good number of bedrooms for trekkers. The bedrooms are just about all twin bedded affairs, each bed with a mattress, clean sheet, pillow and pillow case. Trekkers just put their sleeping bags on top, although most beds also have a blanket. There is no heating in the rooms and expect basic.

Yes you can. And we don’t charge any form of administration fees for a different outbound or return flight to that of the itinerary. Charges will only apply is the flight prices are higher on the different dates (extremely rare).

The Everest Charity Trek itself ends once you get back to Kathmandu so you are then free to extend as you feel.

A couple of extra nights in Kathmandu is common to further explore this city and provide some ‘downtime’ after the rigours of the trek.

For those with time, you can further extend to Pokhara (a couple of nights here is good) or if you’re really going for it, into Bhutan or India.

We provide you with a full Kit List. If you would like one, call us on 01529 488159.

In general terms you need boots, trousers/shorts, base layers/t-shirts, warm clothing, hat, gloves, daysack, sleeping bag but there’s a bit more to it than that!

There are some important items and they tend to be the higher priced ones so they need some careful thought if you don’t want to break the bank! More information can be found on our Information webpage (Kit List tab).

They are:

Sleeping bag – one that will take you down comfortably to -10°C. Depending on your future use (or not), you can beg, borrow, buy or hire these.

Boots – again your choice can depend on potential future use. Try to get waterproof boots. Lightweight ‘summer’ boots will be fine but they will get a hammering on this route. Soles tend to be thinner than better boots so you may feels pebbles/stones underfoot after a while. You can spend anywhere between £50 – £200 depending on what you want/like. The higher end boots will last you a long time, cheaper ones may last just one trek!

Daysack – this is going to be on your back for a significant number of hours so it needs to fit, be comfortable and big enough for your needs. By the time you have everything you need for the day in it, it will weight 6 – 7 kg. A 35 litre capacity is our recommendation. It may look big at first glance but it soon fills with such items as a duvet jacket, waterproofs, water, etc… A well fitted daysack appears lighter than it is! A £5 school bag from ASDA or TESCO isn’t going to do the job in this case I’m afraid!

Duvet Jacket – the locals in the mountains live in these and for good reason. They are lightweight and keep you warm. They are also compact, which helps when carrying. In the UK, they retail at anything from £100 upwards. In Nepal you can them for under half that price. Yes, they are fake North Face or similar but they do the job well enough and can easily get trashed in these conditions.

In general terms, yes, but this will depend on your funding method:

Self funding – yes, any charity, no need to ask them either.
Flexi Funding – we need to check with the charity.
Min Sponsorship – we need to check with the charity.

Call us on 01529 488159 and discuss with us. We can talk to the charity about your Everest Charity Trek for you. If your chosen charity doesn’t work out, we have a list of charities that we know will accept all methods. Some are national well known charities, others are themed (ie children related or mential illness, etc …) others are more local.

A quick overview of our
Everest Charity Trek

Lukla landing – Utube, 1.20 min long